keeping chickens newsletter

Subscribe to this free Newsletter at

Keeping Chickens Newsletter

Page 02

May 2012 Vol. 2

Jump To Page
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

Printable PDF version of this Newsletter
(right click over the above link and then save to your computer)

May2012
Vol. 2

Subscriber Letters

 

Lynda : I've just joined and already I'm loving reading all the wonderful stories
from other members in your newsletters. I started keeping free range Gold Pencilled Hamburgs about 3 years ago quite by chance. It was my first time at keeping poultry and I had been looking to purchase Wyandottes but none were available. One of the breeders I contacted was getting out of breeding GP Hamburgs and she had 3 hens and one rooster to get rid of. I took them on, not knowing a thing about them. They are flighty but they are good layers of small white eggs. It turns out that I have grown to love my pretty little GP Hamburgs. The only drawback is they make poor mothers, so a broody bantam is necessary to get good hatchings of chickens.

As time went by, I gave my brother one of my hatchling roosters and he put
it with GP hens from another breeder. Much to everyone's surprise last year
my brother hatched a number of chickens that were cream or lemon coloured
instead of gold. My brother has since given me one of his Lemon coloured roosters and I will put him in with some of my young hens. I'm thinking that the Cream coloured hatchings are the very rare Lemon Pencilled Hamburg mutation. Did this mutation come from the Red GP Rooster I originally gave my brother or from one of the hens he put with it? Could one of your readers please tell me how this mutation is usually passed down. Lynda in New Zealand.

Susan : I thought I might offer some suggestions to Jess in Maine who loses her free range chickens to "critters". I also live in Maine, however, I have no predators on the little island where I live. But when I visit my mainland friends I always ask them what they do. One little farm that I know has few losses because of the donkey that won't let any critters in their pasture. I also wonder if your chickens roost up in the trees? A smaller breed of hen may also be helpful so they can really be up quite high.

Rosina : I recently brought some chicks. I don't know their exact age maybe about 50 days old and one of them went down on her stomach and her legs shook and she did not seem able to walk - just shuffle along flapping her wings like mad. She was eating fine and the other 2 kept her warm at night. I think it may have been a stroke, but my young neighbor said to me to crush some garlic into a small amount of water and force feed her this maybe every hour (2 cloves to 2-3 tbsp water) then if she is still alive crush small amounts of garlic into the coops water supply every water change (every day for me), and for me it worked since this she has made a full recovery. Don't know if this would work every time but for some peoples chicks it might be a case of life or death.


Jump To Page
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

 
Keeping Chickens Newsletter - Published May 2012 by www.Self-Sufficient-Life.com